Son of a Blitch

Ep. 40 - Princess Goes: Exploring the New Album "Come of Age," the upcoming US Tour, and Future Plans

October 31, 2023 George Blitch Season 1 Episode 40
Son of a Blitch
Ep. 40 - Princess Goes: Exploring the New Album "Come of Age," the upcoming US Tour, and Future Plans
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode, George Blitch gets up-close and personal with the band Princess Goes!

The band consists of musical and creative veterans, Matt Katz-Bohen (Blondie), Peter Yanowitz (The Wallflowers, Natalie Merchant), and Michael C. Hall (Dexter, Six Feet Under, Lazarus). There are many other bands, artists and productions that these gentlemen have been a part of. I highly encourage everyone to take a deep dive into all their fascinating projects! The band originally met during their work on the Broadway production of Hedwig And The Angry Inch, and shortly thereafter, formed the band, Princess Goes To The Butterfly Museum.   

After releasing their self titled EP in 2020, and their first full length album, "Thanks For Coming," in 2021, they have just released their second full length album, "Come of Age," under the newly shortened name, Princess Goes.

Join us as we explore their new album and the upcoming first leg of their US tour. We also discuss their exhilarating experiences on the recent European tour, and the VIP package they are offering during the tours that has fans buzzing with excitement. The VIP tickets offer you a chance to hear stripped down, acoustic performances, obtain a signed poster, and gives you the opportunity to meet the band and take a picture with them, as well. Get you tickets quick - they are sure to sell out, fast!

In this interview, you will find out how the energy of their live performances can breathe new life into their songs and how the band's gear and setup feeds into their distinctive sound. We also examine the band's thrilling experience collaborating with Tim Richardson for the new album's artwork and video.

As we conclude our thrilling conversation, we gaze into the future and explore the band's plans for potential collaborations and the creative process behind their mesmerizing music. Learn about the dream collaborations of each band member and how they plan to reach and entertain a wider audience.

This episode is your exclusive access into the history of the band, the inner workings of Princess Goes, the details of their creative process, their mesmerizing live shows and the magic that breathes life into their enchanting, dynamic and ethereal music.

So, tune in, buckle up, and get ready to rock with Princess Goes!


To learn more about the band visit:
PrincessGoes.com
youtube.com/@princessgoesofficial
IG: "PrincessGoesOfficial"
FB: "PrincessGoesOfficial"

To learn more about George Blitch, visit:
SonofaBlitch.com
youtube.com/@sonofablitch
IG: "TheSonofaBlitch"
FB: "GeorgeBlitch

Speaker 1:

Hey everybody, welcome back to the Son of a Blitch podcast. I'm your host, George Blitch, and today I got a special treat for you. I just had an interview with the band Princess Goes you guys may have formerly known them as Princess Goes to the Butterfly Museum and they are just amazing, amazing artists. They have a new album called Come of Age that just dropped earlier this month, and right now they're about to embark on their first leg of the US tour. They just did a UK European tour and just wrapped that up. We talked a little bit about that and kind of what's to be expected and maybe what songs you're going to be hearing from them on the new US tour. Obviously, they had their first album. Thanks for coming. They have a self titled EP, so they have, you know, 30 to 40 songs that they're choosing from and playing. They also have a VIP experience. So if you guys are going to go and check them out while they're on tour, definitely, for I think it's like a hundred bucks you go ahead and meet the band, you get an acoustic performance. I think you get a signed poster as well and a chance to get some pictures with them as well. So you know, hey, it sounds like a heck of a deal. I strongly suggest you guys check that out. I'll have all the links below for you guys to check out their music and to learn more about their tour. You know, for those who aren't familiar, I wanted to tell you about a little bit the band members. Michael C Hall is the singer. You guys might have known him from his time on Broadway. He's been a part of a head wig, which is where the entire band met Lazarus with David Bowie. He's also been an actor in many shows. You guys might know him as when he played the character Dexter or David Fisher, and six feet under, matt cats. Bowen is the keyboardist, bassist. Key Tarras, the guitarist you know he has written music and toured with Blondie. He's done a lot of amazing, amazing work. And obviously Peter Yenowitz, the drummer he's played with the wallflowers, natalie merchant, morning would, and again, all three of them were working with head wig when they first met and decided to form a band, or rather the band formed them. Have you want to look at it? But guys, I really want you to check out come of age. This album is amazing. I think it's a culmination of a lot of their experiences and talents working together and it's just a mind blowing record and definitely go check out Thanks for coming and their EP. I think you should get them all and start absorbing them and go see them on tour. So once again, guys, enjoy this podcast with Princess goes and without further ado, here we are. Hey fellas, welcome. I'd like to start off by saying congratulations on your amazing new album. Come of age, your second full length album I came out earlier this month and it's a great record. I know you guys just got back from a 10 date tour played all across the UK Paris, germany, netherlands. While it's still fresh in your mind, I wanted to maybe ask each of you what were some of your favorite moments and memorable experiences from that tour.

Speaker 2:

Playing in Paris was pretty great, as you mentioned, because a lot of them don't speak any English and they just would come up to us and speak starts speaking French, which we don't really speak, you know, not hardly at all, but it was still very sweet because you could tell. We all felt the love, I think, and it was very sweet, despite of what they say.

Speaker 1:

Had you been in Paris before personally?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I have a couple of times, yeah, but it's an amazing thing to go to a club that you odds are you'd never otherwise visit, with a room full of people you'd otherwise never see and will likely not see again, and share this sort of 90 minutes and have the experience that some of them are familiar with your music and like it or it means something to them. I mean, it's really, it's really gratifying.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, what about you, peter? What was the experiences that maybe caught your attention and your memory?

Speaker 3:

We played on some big like in the Netherlands. We did. We played twice in Utevecht and we played the second show was on this really big big stage in an orchestra hall called the Tivoli, where you know, like those stones have played, and Nick Cave and we were part of this Dutch poetry night, which was this was one of the random shows on tour that we got added after we had booked the whole tour. They asked us to come back for five songs at this Dutch poetry night. That was based on an event that Alan Ginsburg kind of spearheaded in Amsterdam, you know, I think maybe in the seventies, called Dutch Poetry Night, with all the famous Dutch poets and other poets and musicians, and so that was really cool. Highlight we played on a big stage in front of more people than I think we've ever played. Now. Also in London we played at this amazing place called Earth, with another ginormous stage. When we walked in it was an old, like dilapidated movie theater that had probably had different, different uses over the years and it looked like something out of like Clockwork Orange or something, but that was also a gigantic place. Sounded like a gigantic place, but a beautiful visual place. I mean we had as much stage in front of us as we did behind us, so it was like we were on like a football field. It felt like it makes for a really cool. You know, I think we played in some little dive bars on this tour. We played in some big, spectacular places like the last two. So it's just yeah. Like Mike said, it's just cool to go somewhere, you know, and people know our songs and are singing and you know we got to meet a bunch of fans this time and that was made it really kind of special and I was cheered us up.

Speaker 1:

Well, and you guys are about to embark on your first leg of the US tour. From what I understand, you guys are kind of going to do it in little segments maybe you know 10 or 12 shows at a time take a break, go back to the families and then kind of regroup and do the next leg and during that tour you guys are doing a VIP kind of meet and greet. Now can you kind of talk a little bit about the reasoning of you know, maybe wanting to do these and like shorter legs I assume there's probably some burnout, that you don't want to hit it but also maybe, if you want to talk a little bit about that VIP experience and what that may offer for your fans.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think that's you put it very well. I think I have two kids who are at school. Mike has a kid. You know I think we need to. You know, we don't want to be away from them too long and yeah, it's kind of a beautiful thing to be able to go and play a few shows and then come back home and just do it like that. And yeah, as far as the VIP experience, we play a song for them and then we get to meet them, offer some life advice. You know Peter has really good one liners and you know we take photos with them and yeah, it's just kind of a love fest. It's really nice time.

Speaker 1:

That's great. That's great. Well, you know, thinking about that tour that's coming up, I was very curious about your set lists. Obviously, you guys have two full length albums. You have an EP, the self titled, and I was just kind of curious is there, is it kind of equally spread throughout your you know discography there, or is there something that you guys are? Is it evolving and changing? I think I saw a notes on one of your interviews with a gentleman either from the Netherlands or from Paris and you know there's things scratched out and you know rearranged stuff is how. It was kind of curious. Is there? You know what that looks like? Is that something that you guys kind of have an idea of, these songs, or, at last minute, does something else come in? You know, how are you guys setting that up for the tour?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I think we this tour was unique as we the record came out while we were on tour. So aside from the singles we were released, a lot of the material from the new record was still underwrapped until the very end of the tour. That said, we probably played I don't know five or six songs for the new record. The set was like 20 songs. So we played a good number from the first full length, some from the EP, and there was some tweaking. Some songs went away, some made their way into the set, some of the order changed. This next time we go out we'll probably tweak it again, in part because the record's out now. So we'll maybe have a little bit more stuff from the new record in the set. But you know it's playing songs live from the new record. It's like it's almost like the final stage in the life of discovering a song. You know playing it live and feeling it out and seeing how it plays to an audience. You learn so much about a song that you can't otherwise know when you take that step. So we'll look forward to doing that with some additional songs this next go around.

Speaker 1:

Well, in that same kind of vein of thought, I was wondering are there some songs that you guys had from the EP or from Thanks for Coming that have evolved as you guys have become closer friends? I mean, obviously you met a headwig. There has been many years you've had friendships and the development of the band, but as you guys get to know each other better musically and just the connectivity of your friendships and kind of family, your building, are there some songs that have particularly evolved and kind of maybe brought in a new life of their own while you're playing it live or even just as you guys are rehearsing, that have really kind of morphed that you can kind of identify? Thanks for joining us.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, well, I would say we learned. Like Mike said, we learn a lot when we play live. We took an early version of Blur Out on the last UK tour in 21. It was more of like, you know, heavy hitting, kind of like a little bit more in the U2 world. It was more standard and kind of it was. It was, it was rockin' song, but we, we played it live. It hadn't come out yet and I think I don't know, at least in my mind it felt like we needed to go back to the dry board and we just stripped it, stripped the same produced song down to just Mike's voice and one of Matt's synths and we redid it as like a darker synth wave, kind of you know, minimal track that had only a few elements on it and it just seemed to come to life, to where. That was just an example of a song that we, we took it out on the road. We learned from it. We came back and started over almost and I would say, whatever whispers the same thing. It's that that grew out of a jam Matt and I had in our studio on this old piano that we have in it. It, we had it for a little while and I think Matt turned us on to this band a couple of years ago called Bamba Estereo, from Brazil, a really cool Latin pop band, and I don't know. We just went back and just stripped it down again and tried a different treatment to it and that that would song grew to be what it is on Come of Age a completely different take on it. So yeah, and you know songs like Vicious from our first EP. You know I'm always taken aback every time we play it by how big it feels, live and how it grows. You know it's got almost a life of its own. There's a few songs like that maybe.

Speaker 4:

Matt and Mike, and I think offering felt that way too, like it's. You know that's been the new record, but playing it live it kind of goes to another place that we only discovered playing it live. You know, we, we, we didn't so you feel the same, matthews.

Speaker 1:

There's some, some that stick out, or kind of the ones that they kind of mentioned that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Those songs and then Let it Go, as well as another song on the new album that we released as a single last year, I think, and it was was it last year that we released it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, about a year ago.

Speaker 2:

About a year ago and you know we made some changes, kind of subtle changes, but just just sort of things that I think help help the song move forward. And then we have a song called Land of Make, pretend or Lomp as the acronym, and that's what we've been playing for these meet and greet people, and that song has just gone through sort of an infinite number of rewrites and revolutions and we may have to release an entire album of that song. You know it was different versions, sort of an operatic version, you know industrial metal version, just you name it.

Speaker 1:

Do you guys have a lot of maybe friends or other artists who have remixed some of your songs so that you've maybe given them, you know, some of the software to be able to go and work with that, and are there some that kind of stick out? Because I know there are some remixes that have been out. I was just curious if there's any that kind of caught y'all's attention or that you really maybe helped work on or promote.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think the ketamine remix that the armed did certainly stands out Well. If you're familiar with that band, the armed, I'm not yet Check them out. They're pretty. They're pretty. I don't know what they are. They're sort of this collective, they're like they don't even they don't like to call themselves a band necessarily, but the remix of ketamine is completely sick, and so is Brandon Boost, our mix engineer. He did a remix of ketamine that's quite beautiful in a very different sort of way, very poignant and very beautiful.

Speaker 1:

Nice, any other ones jumping out for the other guys here?

Speaker 4:

I mean, that's the song that I mean we actually, as a kind of experiment did is, I guess, an EP of what was it for remixes of ketamine. And there's, fika is my name, from Finland. They actually open for us for some of our European dates. They did a remix of that song for us, but that was a lot of fun. Yeah, I'd like to. Yeah, I think we'd all be interested in doing that with some other tracks, or not doing it, just sort of giving it to people to do what they will with. It's really interesting to see what comes of that.

Speaker 1:

Oh, some of my buddies in pendulum had done the same thing. They had, I guess, a certain number of like records that they had on there that they had to put out with their record company and they're like, okay, we're going to do a remix stuff and just send it out to everyone. You just really need to see other people's iterations of what they're putting together. Kind of a question I had about y'all's gear and like I used to play in a live PA band and like electronic dance music stuff and a lot of times you know, when I'm performing for the record there's a bunch of different instrumentation and whenever you go to play live there was usually two, maybe three of us and we had to have something to help kind of facilitate all those other sounds that were maybe on the album. So I was kind of curious about what you guys are doing as far as your setup. Maybe you know what software you're running and you know what kind of gear do you have. I know, maybe start with you, peter, I know you've got a look like a rolling kit there and then you have what is that? The kind of an octopad? You know something on the side? I was kind of curious what it is that you're running, and then you know, we'll jump to you guys as well.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, nice one, we did. Yeah, we, because we record in Union Square in New York and like a residential building which you know, we get a lot of noise complaints, and I have a V drum set rolling kit in there, so it just allows me to be able to practice and play drums in New York City, which would be impossible with pure drums. So the cool thing about the V drums is it's got the brain on it and just change, you know, between like an 808 kit or like you know a 909 or any kind of like weird electronic sound or I could put my own sounds in from the record and a lot of real drum sets on there. And yeah, that is an octopad as well. Those were just things I had laying around the studio and they've sort of evolved into being part of our sound. And you know, we, when we first started making music, we we never set out to be any kind of band, we just use whatever the shit we had laying around the studio both of our studios, Matt's in mind and we have an old piano sitting in the studio that is a half step out of tune and just sounds like a hundred year old piano. That ends up on a lot of our recordings just because that's the piano we have.

Speaker 1:

It's there, right.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and I mean, I think, looking ahead to new stuff. We'll probably, you know, look forward to getting into another studio space with a bunch of different sounds and different, bunch of different colors on our palette, and I'll let Matt tell you about that. Matt's the genius behind how we do a lot of this stuff, live with his computers and oh, yeah.

Speaker 2:

So thanks, peter. Yeah, thanks for that introduction. Yeah, yeah, what did you use, george first?

Speaker 1:

What kind of. I had a TD 20 whenever I was there. In a TD 10 previous to that, whenever I was performing I was doing live percussion, and then we had a laptop running logic and then my bandmate would play guitar, grab the bass. He later had a brain tumor which kind of made him not be able to use motor function in his left hand. So we had to kind of adapt a little bit more and kind of have a lot of samplers and different sequencers that were kind of playing that music, but it was mainly just two of us and he did a lot of vocals, I did some MC style work and things, but every show was a little bit different. But we kind of had to adapt. And you know, I remember hearing a story about how you now use the MIDI plug in on your guitar because sometimes the MIDI had gone out and things like that. So I'd heard about different you know different bands that have to deal with these things live. And I was kind of curious, you know, are you using a laptop? Do you have something as a backup and what are you kind of? You know, what are you forming when you're? You're kind of producing these songs, you know, redoing them live.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, totally. What I love about that stuff is every band, a lot of bands do some kind of software sampling or sequencing, but everyone does it slightly differently, like, everyone kind of does it in their own way, which is really interesting. And the way they integrate it with the live show is really cool. So I play with a Phantom, a Roland Phantom keyboard it's the G series, which is an older keyboard, but I like it a lot and that's sort of the main keyboard sounds. Then the keytars plugged in via MIDI cable into that keyboard, which so the keytars drawing the sound is from that keyboard, which was it was also kind of a necessity thing where we just didn't have enough inputs to accommodate adding another inch, you know the keytar inputs. So we're using the Phantom inputs for that, but luckily the sounds are great, I think. And then as far as sequencing, ableton live has been sort of there since the beginning, it was just sort of super easy, super. I started using Cubase, you know, like that was the first DAW that I learned on, and Cubase is great but it's kind of laborious and Ableton is quick and simple and it's super fun to do. So yeah, that's the vibe now.

Speaker 1:

Nice, and then you're playing bass on some tracks, guitar as well. I mean, I saw the acoustic guitar. I know that's probably for you know, the VIP meet and greet, or you bringing that on stage live when y'all are playing some tunes as well.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, the acoustic we use for the song Beja starts with this big rock guitar intro and you know everyone's hands go up in the air. It's like one of those kind of moments. So, yeah, we do with that, and it's also just great to have an acoustic guitar around, you know, because then you know that if everything else goes to shit, hey, at least we have an acoustic guitar.

Speaker 1:

Well, and I saw that think, peter, you were doing some thigh drumming on one of the recordings I saw too, so I expect a thigh drum solo at one of these shows that I go to. I definitely want to see that. Oh yeah, good, good deal. Michael, are you having any effects processors, any foot pedals or things you're operating, or is there someone who's behind the mixing board kind of running any type of effects on your vocals?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, that's our sound guys doing that. Early on I sang to this PC Helicon thing that would try to like stimulate. If there were, if there were things on the recording where I was singing and in two octaves at once, I would mess with it to try to achieve that. But we were able to get a little more sophisticated with that and so, yeah, I'm left the I'm standing behind all this, all this math, in front of all this madness with just my microphone, because I'm a, I'm a tech tard.

Speaker 1:

I was kind of curious. I mean, obviously you performed and Broadway shows, you've done things you know musically before, obviously working in Lazarus, and you know previous performances of being on stage or you know being behind the camera. And I was curious is this your first band to be in or have you played in other bands before?

Speaker 4:

No, this is it. I mean, I guess, technically the first band that I fronted was the band and the head wig and the angry edge of the Broadway show where I met Peter and where Peter subsequently reintroduced himself to Matt, and I mean that was kind of a catalyst for the three of us meeting and for this all happening. So that gave me a taste for it. But no, no, it's. You know, I always did a lot of singing growing up, from the time, you know, I was in a boys choir, you know, before my voice changed so long time ago and have sang as an actor, as you said. But yeah, never, never been in a band. It just, you know, didn't, didn't sort of fall that way until it did.

Speaker 1:

It's a great first band that.

Speaker 4:

I yeah, it's not something I ever anticipated would happen. You know, it's just total, total good fortune, serendipity. You know that I that I hooked up with these guys and that we found that we were able to somehow, without without thinking too hard about it or talking too much about it, make songs together.

Speaker 1:

Well, walk me through maybe that idea of like how you guys obviously working together on the project, but then did somebody say you know what we should jam together, like hey, why don't we come over here and see what we can do together? And then what did that first time musically look like? Did you guys have some songs that you had had maybe pre-recorded, that you brought to the table? Or did you guys sit down and talk about an idea of kind of maybe what you wanted to do? Or was it just kind of super organic and just happened and you're just hanging around one day and poof, the band began.

Speaker 3:

A little bit of that. Yeah, matt and I went on the head week tour after the Broadway show closed. We just got really close and enjoyed each other's company so much. When we got back to New York, you know, I think you know just started hanging out at the studio and we're both musicians, so inevitably we just first record and caught a lot of those early gems that we made together, and one of them was called Love American Style on our first EP, and another one was Vicious. I think Mike and I had dinner one night and I brought it back to the studio and I played them the instrumentals, and he noticed there was no vocals and just offered to throw some vocals down and very shortly after that he was in the studio. I think he wrote some lyrics on Subway Ride downtown and we put vocals on Love American Style first and it was just I mean I guess you know there is something to that first time, you know, first kiss thing of it all and I don't know it was so beautiful and so unexpected. I think is the word that Matt and I would use as well just to hear to send that track around at the end of the day being like what the hell is this Like, whatever it is, let's just keep doing it. And we did Vicious and then, you know, pretty soon we just had like four or five songs and then we had 10 and we were like what's happening here? We were literally playing catch up the whole time and it was kind of fun because that's happened very few times in my life and my creative life it's so much of it is. You know, hey, let's do this or let's do that, or you want to do this and what should we do? You know, this one, we feel like we've all been playing catch up to this energy that we're. You know, obviously we're in it, but I also feel like it's bigger than all three of us and we're just kind of pinching ourselves to be able to create together and it's hard to talk about. We don't really enjoy figuring out why. But we are also like what the hell is going on? And now we have like 30 something songs and it's just like holy shit, this is awesome, you know, really unexpected life gift.

Speaker 1:

That's wonderful. I'm so glad to hear that. And you know you guys put out I mean, Come of Ages is a wonderful album. I'm just blown away by it. And I kind of wanted to ask a question too about the idea of the design and the cover. I believe it was Tim Richardson that you guys worked with and also did some work with the Shimmer video from, if I'm not correct there, and then I was kind of curious how you guys connected with him, how that connection came about. And then you know, maybe if one of you guys wants to tackle the idea of the imagery of the album and your transition from Princess Goes to the Butterfly Museum, to Princess Goes that imagery from what I remember was like kind of an unspoken synergistic sequence of events then that, because it I feel like symbolically there's something that somebody, if they wanted to, could draw into that imagery for the idea of the transition of the name. And so if you know y'all can kind of maybe tack, you know, tackle that question and run with that, if you wouldn't mind.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, we had a acquaintance in common who thought that Tim might be an interesting candidate to do a video for us and invited him to see us play and he liked the show and we gave him a number of tracks and he responded to Shimmer as one that he wanted to explore making a video for it was a video that originally was going to be a lot less involved in terms of the graphics and the post-production element, but he just got inspired to run with this idea and we were like, yeah, man, run with it. And I remember he would tell us about it and he would send these little mock-ups that looked like a sort of like bad video game from the 80s. You know, he was just like, trust me, trust me, all these blanks are going to get filled in. And then when he showed us the final video, it was just like kind of mind-blowing. But in addition to making that video, he also came up with that image of the skull made of like these albino butterflies and crown of golden butterflies, and he did all that at a time before we decided to shorten the name. But yeah, it did turn out that it was kind of a perfect image to transition to the shorter name and I mean, I don't think we're necessarily saying that the butterflies are dead, but there's something about that image that I feel like does. And this thing goes for the video. You know, he just sort of intuited something about the feel of that song. That felt totally right and the image of that skull feels simultaneously foreboding and beautiful and heavy and dark and also kind of light, and I'd like to think that maybe those kind of juxtapositions or extremes are alive in our music. My dog's barking, but yeah, it's just another kind of or like a really primary example of collaborating with someone and just letting them run with their inspiration because of an intuitive sense that they kind of get us. And everything Tim came up with is sort of next level and very much just in sync with our sensibility in ways that we couldn't have described him or given him an assignment to come up with. He just kind of got it.

Speaker 1:

Well, that kind of feels like what you guys are talking about, just as your formation and you guys all coming together, and that there's something that's going on almost feels like it's kind of pulling you along and you have this connectivity of it and that maybe just kind of another kind of layer of that, with someone like Tim coming in, that this thing is just pulsing and y'all are just enjoying it and going for the ride. So, yeah, sometimes it's neat to when those pieces fall in the right place and kind of help paint that picture, you know, figuratively and literally, so to speak. So yeah, yeah, I like that. That's great. One last question for each of you guys, if you would mind. I was kind of curious if you were to bring one musician into the band to collaborate on a song or two, who would that be for each one of you? Alive or dead, or yeah, yeah, yeah, go ahead, Alive or dead. You're like, I have two different people.

Speaker 3:

That's a good question.

Speaker 4:

I'd say Donnie McCastlin. He is the band leader of the band that played the music on the Black Star album David Bowie's last record and it's just the phenomenal saxophone player and musician and improvisational player and he kind of he plays in a way that's pretty otherworldly and, yeah, I'm gonna go with him. That's maybe even something that would happen.

Speaker 1:

Ah okay there we go, cleaning the seed.

Speaker 2:

Good idea. Yeah, let's make it happen. Let's make it happen. Nice, I think there's so many. I saw Depesh Mood last night and so now I've sort of been having them on the brain. You know, obviously Martin Gore or David Gehan would be pretty great to do some kind of collab with I'll put that out there but also the Polish artist named Hania Rani, who is just incredible and I feel like she would also go really well with what we do. She's an electronic and piano artist Awesome.

Speaker 3:

What about you. Peter, mike and Matt gave such good, cool answers that I'm gonna go straight up cheesy and just say if we could get Taylor Swift in the room and just play anything she wants or sing anything she wants, I think that would you know. Like every band, we're struggling to be heard and be seen, and I mean not struggling, but our challenge is to you know, we want to get as many years as we can on our music and share this music with as wide of a community as we can, and I think nobody's got as much reach as her right now. So I'm just gonna go with her, just selfishly, because I want to get people to know about this band, you know.

Speaker 2:

Give us a chance. Taylor, If you hear this, give us a chance.

Speaker 3:

George make it happen man.

Speaker 1:

I'm gonna make some phone calls, man, I'm gonna send this through my buddies. I mentioned the band earlier, Pendulum. They actually did a cover of one of Taylor's tracks and I guess they responded to her. So maybe I'll call my buddy, KJ at the drummer, and be like all right, make this happen, guys, Come on so.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, no, just you know, I want to say I'm a fan of hers. I think she's incredible and she writes on, you know, writes her own songs and she's a real deal, you know it's like, so you put that in there too.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it doesn't have like 23 producers on one track. Yeah, now it's always nice to see. Well, guys, I really appreciate y'all coming out and joining the Son of Lich podcast. Definitely want to have you guys out again when you're on tour. I'm gonna come and try to check out a set. I really want to see you guys live Before we go. If you guys can go ahead, you know, throw your socials out there website where people can go and kind of jump on this train where they can go and get tickets to be able to see you. I know you got November or is it December and January dates coming up here on the US tour, the first leg, and you know how can people go ahead and kind of follow this journey and join along as well.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's princessgoescom and Instagram is princessgoesofficial, so Twitter, YouTube, PrincessgoesOfficial all that stuff Wonderful.

Speaker 1:

Well, guys, thanks again, once again for joining and best of luck and on the rest of the tours that you got going on, and thanks again for sharing this amazing music you guys came up with and you guys have been sharing your talents on everything you've done. I really appreciate it. Thanks, george, talk to you All right y'all take care, you too man.

Princess Goes Band US Tour Highlights
Evolution of Songs and Remixes
Collaborating With Tim Richardson for Album Art Design
Musicians' Choices for Collaborations

Podcasts we love