Son of a Blitch

Ep. 37 - Chef Jean Paul Bourgeois (Creator & Host of "Duck Camp Dinners")

October 09, 2023 George Blitch Season 1 Episode 37
Son of a Blitch
Ep. 37 - Chef Jean Paul Bourgeois (Creator & Host of "Duck Camp Dinners")
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Get ready to be captivated by the rich culinary and outdoor experiences of Louisiana's very own, Chef Jean-Paul Bourgeois. Savour the flavours of his unique blend of outdoor and culinary passion as he takes us on a journey from Louisiana to California, the Virgin Islands to New York, France to Atlanta, and back.

Listen in as he shares his enriching encounters, from working on his acclaimed "Duck Camp Dinners" series, running some of the best restaurants in the country, to his appearances on many popular shows, including "Good Morning, America", "Timber Tours" with First Lite, and "MeatEater", and many more.

Our conversation explores the captivating intersections of Chef Jean-Paul's love for the outdoors and cooking, and how this has uniquely shaped his exceptional culinary style. He offers us a glimpse into his latest venture with the Louisiana Office of Tourism for season three of Duck Camp Dinners, a celebration of the life cycle of a duck camp, through the food and people of Louisiana.

Follow along as we delve into the challenges facing Louisiana's wildlife and habitats such as the impacts of droughts and marsh fires, and the ripple effects on the local community.

Finally, we deep-dive into his exciting future plans, including his vision for potentially expanding to other states and his commitment to staying authentic and present in his work.

Chef Jean-Paul generously shares some insightful hunting tips and a delightful teal season recipe.

This episode is brimming with inspirational conversations, wisdom, and insights that you won't want to miss!


The 3rd season of "Duck Camp Dinners" will appear on Waypoint TV, and Jean-Paul is working alongside the Louisiana Office of Tourism, as well as many of his long term partners, such as Boss Shotshells and Slap Ya Mama seasoning and sauces.

To learn more about Jean-Paul visit his website:
www.JeanPaulBourgeois.com
Follow him on IG: “chefjean_paul
Jean-Paul's YouTube Channel

And be sure to search for “Duck Camp Dinners” and “Timber Tours” to see some great content that Jean-Paul has shared with us all!

I've made it my personal mission to represent and revive the cuisine of my Louisianan kin and that of all southerners. As a man, a chef and an outdoorsman, I strive to honor and celebrate the traditions of southern cooking and cultures that came before us through sustainable food ways and new world techniques.” ~JPB

Speaker 1:

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Son of a Blitch podcast. I'm your host, george Blitch man. Y'all are in for a treat today. You're about to check out an interview I did with Chef Jean-Paul Bourgeois. Jean-paul was born and raised in Louisiana and, like many Louisians, he was cooking and hunting. At a very young age he developed a love for the outdoors, which he talks about, which he further explored when he decided he wanted to be a professional cook and he went and did the training and became a world-renowned chef. You've probably seen him on Good Morning America, fox and Friends Duck Camp dinners, which season one and two are on YouTube for you guys to search out, and he just announced that season three is now being filmed. As I'm talking right now, jean-paul is traveling around Louisiana filming Duck Camp dinner, season three. He's working with the Louisiana Board of Tourism and a bunch of other fine partners in this. I cannot wait. It'll probably be coming out in early 2024. So you guys make sure you mark that on the calendars whenever he's going to be announcing that, because it is going to be something you're going to want to tune into, something a little bit different. This year it's going to be going all around Louisiana State. I cannot wait. If you need something in the meantime to satisfy that need, go check out Duck Camp dinners. Go check out First Light's Timber Tours. He's also been on Mead Eater and man, jean-paul is just an incredible, incredible guy. I had such a fun time chatting with him. We explored all sorts of different topics and I just can't wait for you guys to dive in, so I'm going to bow out. You guys tune in. Here is my podcast with Chef Jean-Paul Bourgeois. Hey, jean-paul, how you doing today? Man, I'm good. George, how about yourself? Fantastic, man, fantastic, I'm so excited we get to chat today. Man, I got a lot of questions for you. I think the best place to start is really find out about where you grew up, how you got into your hunting and cooking and just that exposure in the outdoor world, who are some of maybe the people who are mentoring you and kind of guiding you through that, and maybe just kind of start at the genesis of that experience for you, if you will.

Speaker 2:

Man, that's a hope we have enough time in this podcast for that I mean. Look, very simply, I'm from South Louisiana and so the culinary thumbprint on that state is just so big and so diverse. It makes it really difficult to grow up in South Louisiana and not be connected to food. That's one. In the same way, it makes it very difficult to grow up in South Louisiana and not be connected to the outdoors, whether that's hunting, fishing, whether that's ducks or deer or any of the things in between, and usually the culinary side of it or the food side of it and the outdoor side of it kind of run the same parallel paths. So you know, I think the short answer to your question is just being from South Louisiana put me in a lot of position to just love food and love the outdoors and not do them as a separate entity, if you will, but as one. That kind of ran as parallel structures to each other that you always used for each other. For example, you know a lot of the cooking that I learned as a young boy, even before going to culinary school, was at hunting and fishing camps. Right Now, current day, the really the only reason why I go in the outdoors to hunt or fish is to cook. Right, it's to cook those things and so at one time in my life one led me to the other and now it leads me the other way and it keeps kind of switching back and forth. And so I see, just from being from South Louisiana, I'm sure you know a lot of folks from Texas and Alaska and other places where there's huge, just very long-standing history of being in the outdoors and hunting and fishing and have these really cool culinary footprints as well. They can probably find a lot similar to what I'm saying right now. Just kind of growing up there really fed your curiosity, fed my curiosity and just my kind of inquisitiveness to just keep learning more and keep walking down that path. You know, but I didn't always call the outdoors a professional way of life. For the most part it was in the culinary arts and it was cooking in professional kitchens everywhere, from beach bars to Michelin stars. I've cooked in. So and that goes from Louisiana, new York City, st Thomas and the Virgin Islands, california, both in Napa Valley and San Francisco, and then eating all over the world and my travels has really helped me. Kind of what I consider like if a painter has a palette of colors, it may only start with eight, but at the end of that painting he has blotches of colors all over the place that he can use to kind of paint his picture. And in a lot of ways, I think a lot of chefs think of their creativity in that way. It's like as a kid we had eight solid colors, like the eight colors that come in a Crayola box. Right right, as we grow older and that never stops those colors start blending, those colors start becoming new colors and new shades and new hues. And that's how I cook. It's an ever evolving thing. I'm 39 years old right now and I certainly don't cook the same way as I did when I graduated culinary school in 2006. So, and I don't intend on stopping that progress until the Lord puts me in the dirt. So that's, that's, you know, a huge part. Being from South Louisiana, always being inoculated with food in my parents' kitchen and hunting and fishing camps, and then also being the outdoors, being able to get to a boat ramp in 20 minutes, 30 minutes hunt, get back before school. My dad used to take me hunting. Then he'd go in and try, try court cases as a lawyer at nine o'clock in the court in a local courthouse, right after duck hunting. So, and he was a guy that went 40, 45, 55 days out of the year and there's 60 of them, so he was pretty serious about it. But we only had that access because of living in South Louisiana and having that proximity, having that easy resource to get out into the marsh hunt birds and get back and like, start your quote unquote normal day.

Speaker 1:

Right, right, right Is this. Did you have like a passion from a kid knowing that, like this is something you kind of wanted to do as a profession, whether it's, you know, making a living in the outdoor space or in that culinary world? When did you kind of have maybe that epiphany? Or, I mean, was there a moment that you realized, like I can do this and this can be something that I can make a living at and I can meld my passion with everything that I want to do and be able to have the paycheck involved as well?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think that came in basically three different buckets and the first one came from a food side and I was really good at cooking from a very young age and very curious about it from a very young age, from like my earliest memories from my dad cooking. Then when I was able to reach a stove and start cooking and I went at the time when I was seven, eight, nine years old, I wasn't thinking like I want to be a chef, right, but I always was good at and I was always the guy to do it at these different hunting camps in high school and in college and so on. Once we reached, once I reached college, I went to Nichols State in Tibodeau, louisiana, which is where I'm from, and the chef John Falls Culinary Institute is there. I went into orientation, went into the psychology classes and I quickly realized I was like as much as the human mind really interests me, it's not where I'm not just, I'm just simple, not that smart. I was like but I'm pretty good at cooking. The culinary school was right there. I signed up. I changed my curriculum the day of orientation. I signed up for culinary school. I graduated top of my class and that was the point. At orientation. I was like psychology probably a little, probably not that smart, but I am good at cooking and that was that, I guess, that little turning point there when the outdoors came. You know. So, all through high school and college I spent time a lot of duck hunting, a lot of fishing. But then when I moved outside of Louisiana, I took hiatuses for a number of different reasons. One I was a broke cook. I didn't know. The first place I moved from when I was out of culinary school was California, the Napa Valley. I didn't know anything about, of course, like there was such a huge new world, living in the Napa Valley, straight out of Tibodeau, louisiana, never living anywhere else and then moving there. It was a culture shock in a very good way. But and I was my my attention was so diverted to food and culinary that I kind of left the outdoors a little bit behind. I would come home to Louisiana and hunt and fish for a week at a time, two or three times a year, but I would never really do it there in California. Then I moved to St Thomas in the Virgin Islands, lived there for 18 months, went on a couple fishing trips, spent my time at the beach drinking services and, you know, working at a beach bar. And then I came to New York and again that that cycle continued. I'd always come back to Louisiana, hunt and fish and come, and that would be like basically the time off I would take from the kitchen Right. Then, finally, I started to get into more video work. You know I was on some food network things. I would do Good morning America and live segment, cbs, the Dish Fox and Friends and so on, and I had, I had taken media classes when I got promoted to my executive chef job because there was going to be so much media like well, look at that raining out there. We needed that here?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we did, we sure did.

Speaker 2:

There was. There was so much of media emphasis around my job because it was New York and we were doing a big rebranding, and so they, they wanted me to take media classes and so I did and I was really good at it and I liked it and I really. And so I started getting into more productions and starting getting interested, meeting more people in the production industry and the entertainment and media industries, but really focused around food centric productions there in New York and I started just getting interested in it. And that's when I had this little epiphany, when I was thinking about duck camp dinners. I'd created a pilot already of a show that we're still trying to get onto an air somewhere. I'd been part of another pilot for a production around travel and food around the south that never got green lit. And then finally I was like man I and I'd always loved duck hunting since the time I was eight years old, seven years old when my dad first took me and we would go religiously during the season. That's really what that would give. That gave me the bug before I was 10 years old, right, and finally I said, man, you know what? There's this great duck camp that I love to go to and it's the one that we shot all in season one. We call it the hobo hobo hut or hobo hilton. It's now. It's now graduating to hoboville, because there's multiple different camps now connected or structures connected to make the camp, and I wanted to memorialize the place and I knew it was a special place because we all thought it was that special. We all thought that it was just. Everybody, all of our friends, always wants to go there, but you only have so many beds, so only so many people go. Luckily, I'm the chef, I'm the cook, you got a spot, I got a spot. I got a permanent spot and so, but selfishly, I was like man, I really want to memorialize this place. I got this weird fear about getting dementia or Alzheimer's at some point and losing all memory of all the things that I love and people I love, and so I had this. I wanted to make this show that memorializes place that we could always go back to, no matter if a hurricane wiped it out or you know, if we had some friends that went through some hard times, you could always come back to those videos. And that was really the genesis of why I wanted to make that show. And once we made it and I saw the reaction from people I that was, and this is the second bucket I was like man, if I can make food and hunting my career, it's never a job, yeah, that's never a job, and that's just something that I get, that I am fortunate enough to love to do and that can get paid to do, yeah, and make these productions and do these different things, and I'll never work a day in my life if I could just cook for people and be in the outdoors. And so that was. You know, after that first season came out, I saw that we might have something, that there was this spark that said that people kept saying, man, thank you for creating a show that Louis Anans can be proud in, because I think at that point there was no show that Louis Anans could look like and see themselves in. And I'll leave those names out of, like the mass market media shows, but you know what they are, yep, and know Louis Anans that I know, like pointed at those shows, like that's us, yeah, it's always been this character of us, right, right. And so we want to end that's and that's what we made in Duck Camp Dinner, season 1. And that's just from a pure authentic, non-scripted, literally. We didn't know how many episodes we were going to do. We at first we wanted them to be eight minutes long. They ended up being anywhere from 23, like 16 minutes to 23 minutes long, and creating six episodes. We had no structure. We had no idea how to film it. It was me and Daniel Bagby. He was the camera one. I said, dude, just film everything, we'll worry about it in the edit. You know like the idea was like the life cycle of the Duck Camp, which is why we started the grocery store and we ended my parents' house cooking what we caught at the camp. And that was it. Man and people, just that was that second bucket that kind of spurred that enlightenment, that like man, like I, could do this. I have one. I'm good at cooking on camera, I'm comfortable with it, I love being on camera. So, like some people aren't comfortable with admitting that, I am Like I'm good with that, I know that's a part of what the gift that God gave me, and it would be it would be almost sinful of me not to acknowledge that right. Just like he gave me the gift of cooking, he gave me the gift to better speak about it and and and kind of teach it from a visual and and and verbal way. So, and the other one would be travel, and travel in general is is my other main like inspiration right, and I'm a big believer that food can transport. It has these incredible transport of properties, not just to transport us back in time with something like you know your grandma's fate, your compile recipe for Thanksgiving, and transports you back there. It could also transport us into other countries and other places and other cultures, and you know that's why I travel. I search for that, so then I can come back home, recreate and transport myself back into Morocco, into Southern Vietnam, into Japan, into Mexico City, into Canada. You know like so and I love travel in that way, and so that's my, that's my third bucket and, if I could ever, my goal is like to just connect those in a way to where, no matter what I'm doing, I'm using this, the travel and outdoors and food experience, and better to tell that story through different people's eyes and different lenses. That that would be what I think. You know, who knows? You know, that's the mountain I'm climbing now. If I can ever reach that peak, there'll probably be a bigger mountain in the distance. That's like well, I should probably go climb that one. That one looks pretty good, and I think that's just the drive of me, just wanting to create and wanting to, you know, be a part of new things.

Speaker 1:

So those good answers, man, I mean I would. I was very impressed when I watched duck camp dinners.

Speaker 2:

You know, there's two seasons that are out now. Yes, sir.

Speaker 1:

And then I guess if we can just give some, you know, maybe a little one minute snapshot for people who want to know what that show is, because, like people who aren't from the south and haven't gone through Louisiana, they might not understand what a duck camp is like so if you can just give it like this super quick overview and then I'd like to talk about duck camp, dinners three and what's happening that because that's about to kick off here pretty soon, that's right, and if you can kind of go ahead and tell me about what's happened with that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, duck camp dinners is the life cycle duck camp through the food we eat and the people we share it with, and in south Louisiana those people typically your friends and your family. And the gathering place of most places in south Louisiana is the kitchen, whether that be your home kitchen or your hunting camp. And the show in season one, two and three explores those duck camps, not necessarily through the, through the eyes of being a duck hunter, but through the eyes of sharing a community of people who are interested in the same things the culture of Louisiana, the food of Louisiana, the hunting of Louisiana, and just sharing that in this one central place of the duck camp. And season two, season one, two and three season one was just one duck camp, season two was two like three or four duck camps and then season three will be seven duck camps, if not more. That really explores the culture of those duck stank duck camps through the food we eat and the people we share it with.

Speaker 1:

What do you see is, like the difference between those seven? Is they're going to be something like a variation of like hey, this area and or just can be like focusing on these different people, or is it going to be maybe at this we're going to focus maybe on you know ducks and maybe some fish, and on this one we're maybe going to bring because, like in one of those episodes I remember, you guys roll up and you're hunting hogs right on the edge there, that kind of Martian mean. There was the inclusion of that as well. So it's not that you know, when you think about like maybe you know ducks, it's not just ducks, you have other things to, and there's deer all around that area. So there's a lot of different animals and you know, obviously there's some really great fish around there and to and some other things in the ocean that you're cooking up. So is that something that you're going to kind of just paint broad strokes or is there something that you kind of have focused on each one? Or again, is it kind of unscripted? You guys are just running at it? Yeah, fix it in post.

Speaker 2:

It's really, it really is unscripted. We just we've done our best to say like, okay, here's the camps we're going to go to, here's the pursuits we're going to go after, but we know these are wild animals, is this is wild weather, things change and we've been come really adaptable to how those things change. It is so season three we've been lucky to partner with the Louisiana office of tourism, who's been a huge part of the funding for season three, which takes a lot of kind of weight off my shoulders are going try to sell sponsorships and product sponsors and so on, and I think the reason why is Louisiana. Louisiana is a state as a tourism board saw the show as like, oh, wow, like this is a really unique way, authentic way of getting telling the story outside of New Orleans, because it almost 99% of people flying in New Orleans, sure, and 99% of them stay inside of New Orleans, and our goal is to say in a lot of ways look at all the great things that are happening outside New Orleans, great city, great town, love the place. Yeah, there's so much more that goes on. So we're going to be filming at seven different locations throughout the whole state and season two it was mostly just the Cajun coastline, right, right. So the southern part, all the way from the east side all to the west side this year and season three it'll hit all four corners, plus some places in central. It will show a much more diverse hunting culture in terms of in terms of the hunt, because there's wooded areas, is marshy, there's rice, there's rivers and so on and so forth. So there's that. And then to your point about second pursuits and third pursuits we always like to have. That obviously depends on the actual hunting season, what's in season. And you know feral hogs in season, year around. Red snapper, which we do on season. Season two, episode five or six, that's in season. That was in season during a certain time that we were filming. So we went do that and the goal is always to go those camps and be like, honestly, guys, we just want to do what you all do, so you all are going to set drug lines or trot lines or go hunt raccoons at night or squirrel hunt with dogs. That's what we want to do, we know there. We want a second pursuit, but what that is, we're game, and I don't care if we've done it before, because, again, the key is to just show that camp culture in a very authentic way, not script and say we're just here to follow along and to document. And so when you go look back on this 20 years, you look at this episode like I'm proud of that episode, I'm proud of what we did and they did us right. And that's the that's the goal of the show is like we want it to be something that every Louisiana and every person around every Louisiana, one and every camp owner can say God, thank goodness, I did that because now I always have it just like I felt around season one yeah right. But also what we see over and over and over again is people from all around the world all around the world, george that say Holy shit, I know this place, I know those people, I know that food because, whether it's pheasant camps or mule deer camps or salmon salmon camps down in South Argentina, they have a group of friends that go to a place, pursue something, cook, have cut up, have fun, yeah, fun, yep, we all have those places. Typically, I shouldn't say we all, but a lot of us have those places and no matter if you're duck hunter or whatever, you see yourself in those shows, and that's only because we keep it 100 man, we don't. Yeah, it's just Other than where we're gonna go and who we're hunting with and what we think is gonna we're gonna hunt. Everything else is To just film the camp film what happens like film the jokes, beep out, the curse words. If we need to right, you know, like be responsible, yeah, like not not go in a boat and drive around with beers, right, right, not go hunting, yeah, we don't do that anyway. But it's like you want to be responsible in those things, but it's, it's just, we just don't scripted, we don't. We found that Everything else is scripted and everything you know. If you watch hunting shows now and that a deer gets shot and may have that kill shot, but that whole rise up like this, that's all, after the fact, for the mo, for a lot of right, like that's like yeah, okay, now we need to get the shot. Yeah, like there is no, none, there's none of that. There is no like second takes, except for when, like, I'm just so tired, I'm going through a recipe and I'm saying I'm saying cauliflower instead of broccoli or something like that. Obviously I'm like all right, and even so, sometimes we'll put those edits right in there, because it's. That's the case, like we're all so tired. Yeah, after that hunt, whether you're filming it or not, sure you know, we all have something to get made fun about so.

Speaker 1:

But that's that authenticity I feel like plays so well, because it is something everyone can kind of see themselves into. Who hasn't stayed up too late at Camp, whether it's your hunting place? Wherever you're waking up early in the morning, you are tired. You mean you're dragging ass and you're getting out there, but you're still doing it, you're still pursuing it. Yeah, you might say, call Florence that a broccoli, but whatever, it's what I'm like, you're honest about it and you're like yeah, guys, I'm tired today. Yeah, like it's been a long day. Well, yeah, it has. And I guess you know I kind of wanted to to ask more about, like you know, with season three, where is this going to end up? Like I know that you know you can see right now Season one and two on on YouTube. Is it gonna stay there? Is this something that you're gonna have in some other? You know, outdoor networks. What does that look like? As far as like moving forward and you know, are you gonna be taking all of these duck camps into Ducking at dinner's dinners, into a new spot?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, great question. So, yeah, currently, right now, you can watch season one and two on the meat eater YouTube channel and it's had tremendous success there and I'm really thankful for that partnership. We're moving on from the media to YouTube channel. Season three will premiere on Waypoint TV. It'll be on wait. Season one and two will also be on Waypoint TV starting later this year. For those who haven't seen it on on YouTube channel, you can watch it on Waypoint. And the reason why I love this partnership with Waypoint because of their distribution through multiple different subscription and streaming services that are highly, you know, um Traffic to buy by folks and so just gives people a lot more access to watch it if you're not a big fan of watching on your computer or YouTube. So really excited about that partnership, especially Now that we can put all three episodes in one spot, all three seasons, excuse me, in one spot and They've been just really great partners thus far and I don't see any reason for that to change. Really excited about that. We it would. It will likely put season three also on a YouTube channel, but you know the pressure is off at that point to put it on a YouTube channel because Waypoint has such a great distribution model and great Again traffic through all their, all their partners, that we really feel like this is gonna be our time to make a big splash, and so we're looking at season three to be our best season ever. I kind of look at these, every product, everything that I do is like this is the last one I'm doing you better go out with a bang, yeah, right, like I just do not count and and that's just me Just saying like I don't ever want to rest that there's gonna be more of this. Yeah, yeah. If this, this, is the last season, we're gonna make it the best season. And if, god willing, there's a season four, then then so be it. But season three, as far as I'm concerned, there ain't gonna be another season after this, and Hopefully I'm proven wrong. Honestly, I would love there to be a multi-deer deal, multi-million, multi-year contract sure. But I just right now, just the grind, the hustle is real and I'm looking at season three to be the best ever and I think Waypoint TV is the optimal Place to put that on. And you know I own everything, so I own all the media to it, I own all photography and video assets and I will for season three as well, and I own season one and two. So you know we have the ability, as we're building that library, to do more stuff with it and so, excited, excited about that. Also excited, I'm wearing a boss shot shells hat and just a shout out to them because they came in as a With. Just like I love disruptors right, I'm a disruptive kind of guy by nature, I think I think duck camp dinners is a disruptive show in the outdoor space and the culinary space combined. I don't think it fits any one mold and I think that's why people respond to it. And I love boss shot shells and obviously great shells and I've shot them for the last two seasons, even when they weren't a part of duck camp dinners. But they've came out, come in to be a significant partner in duck camp dinners and hopefully that's a long relationship that we can build as disruptors disruptors together.

Speaker 1:

How do you define them as disruptors? What was it about them that you? Felt like kind of felt the familiar with that.

Speaker 2:

Well, I just feel like they were. They, you know, going the director consumer route, doing the copper plated business and offering business at a price that Normal people can buy, right, I mean, there's business shells. Right now they're $70 a box, yeah right, $700 a case, right, that's a lot different from a boss shot shell. That you can. That's copper plated business that you can go direct to consumer. I haven't never had a boss shot shell misfire on me or not shoot and, honestly, like the people, the culture of that company as I've come to know the owners and the time in the lead in the top players in it, which is very small, they're just Good people and it's people. I'm a big believer in this. My dad used to say this about my friends. He was like Jean Paul, you are, you hang out with, yeah, you know, yeah, I'm a big believer in that and it's the reason why I've made a lot of decisions in the past two Weeks to a month one to leave meat eater, one to go to Waypoint TV, one to partner with boss shot shells, louisiana office of tourism. Because, like, honestly, like you are who you friend, you are who your friends are and your reflection of the people you do business with yep and I want the my circles to be tight aligned and supportive of each other and those four that I just mentioned there Between boss losing a tour tourism waypoint and then duckhand dinners and split-read media who who produces show with me? They're just people that I want to be involved in, that I want to do business with, that are invited to my house, that you know, that I can Call on in times of need and just to say Merry Christmas. You know right, sure, that's kind of people I want in my life and I think if you do business that way, you're likely maybe you won't make the most money, but you'll likely always be happy and I feel like that's pretty darn valuable.

Speaker 1:

Hey, everybody just wanted to take a minute to tell you about Boss Shot Shells. If you guys have not checked them out yet, I highly suggest you go over to their website. Boss Shot Shells offers superior grade, american made copper plated business shot shells that are shipped directly to your door. As a pro 2A, family owned small business, boss designs every shell for a specific purpose to deliver devastatingly lethal payloads at a price that won't break the bank. Backed by the best customer service in the industry and proudly manufactured at a small facility in Southwest Michigan, boss stands for American Innovation and Old School Conservation, unleaded and unmuscled. Check them out at BossShotsShellscom. Money doesn't buy you that happiness. It can definitely help you out with a lot of things and obviously life can get expensive. But whenever you can say that you have your integrity, when you can be able to be your authentic self, you can be around people that are very similar and you can vibe with them, it's like you're going to have fun, you're going to have success, because you're not going to have those regrets and money doesn't fix the regrets right and you being able to say I did this, I did it with these people that I like. We have this connectivity, we can build this thing together, whatever it builds to. And I like your idea too, that approach too, of like you're going all in on season three too right, because that also not only does it you know all those things we just talked about, that authenticity and that connectivity but it also has that here and now You're. You know, it's not like it's like the Rolling Stones hey, we're going to have our farewell tour, the third one, you know. But it's like the idea that you were really going in and you're saying I'm here, I'm now, I'm present, I'm going all in, putting everything I get into this. And that's that grind mentality too, where you're like I'm not leaving anything unsaid on here and if you do that, it's going to speak for itself. A season four is likely going to come. More people are going to connect to it and they're going to want to be a part of it or it'll grow to that Like I was kind of curious too do you have plans to maybe work in other states and kind of be able to show that kind of microcosmic level per state or maybe per animals that are in that area? Because I could see like you did such a great job representing Louisiana and all those you know, the duck camps and all the outdoor. You know lifestyle things and, obviously to the credit of you know everyone you know following in and loving that. I always wondered if that's like something that you could see yourself expanding on in another area 100%, george.

Speaker 2:

I mean, this is Louisiana, is my home. Obviously I love the place, I'm invested in it from a very like visceral point of view. I just wanted to succeed, even though I don't live in Louisiana currently right, I live in Texas, but I'm always, I do a lot of work in Louisiana. For that reason, I just I feel like that state gave me so much right, so much culture, so much foundation of being the man I am today. I'll probably spend the rest of my life trying to repay it in ways like this, like just trying to get more people visiting there, more people hunting there, more people spending money there. I may not, maybe I never lived there, so I can't give back my taxes to it, but I can get, hopefully, get more eyes on the state and hopefully, like we look at conservation and land loss and saltwater intrusion and hurricanes, environmental things that happen to that state, you know, the more I can talk about that, the more money we can get appropriated to those things, whether that's state or state or federal levels. And so you know it's nuanced the way I think about my relationship with Louisiana, but it all comes from a place of just wanting to see it succeed, more so than it has been before. Not saying it's never like succeeded quotes, but I just want that progress to continue to happen in that state. Now I can be a little part of that, then great. But to your point, like Texas is a great example of a state that would be incredible to have a duck camp dinners season in, or another show that was tailored in a way that can go out to certain pursuits during certain seasons. You know I often talk about Texas and it's that, like other than Alaska, it may be the state that has the broadest spectrum, the biggest spectrum of pursuits that I know of. Maybe I can be proven wrong, I'm sure I can, but from sandhill cranes in the north to fat trout down in Rockport, to, I mean, even hunting elk in the Southwest, to your black bucks or I shouldn't say black bucks, the melanistic deer down in your way and all the little. I mean timber hunting in East Texas, like there's just Chupacabras All of it. Well, I mean like. I mean then you're like Farrell hogs and then you're like Axis deer and then your whitetails of course. Then you're, you know, public and private and high fence and low fence and blah blah. It's just so much here to unravel and uncover. And I think that I mean honestly. I know that in a large part of the country, and I know this just from my past couple of years, that a lot of outdoorsmen look at Texas and be like, oh that's just all, high fenced mutation deer grow up. You know they're all just farming those deer out. And although there that certainly is a business and certainly does happen, that certainly is a thing. There's just so much more. And to not talk about that or not even to like acknowledge that is actually pretty unfair. And but you know it is, it's an incredible state I can certainly see even the duck cam dinners are a spin off of a show like that happening here. You know, the hardest thing like I'm, I can, I can get like I feel good about getting distribution anytime I want now on on pretty big levels. I'm connected enough and have done it enough to feel like I can do that. Plus, I have some partners working with me on the coast, on each coast. That helped me get into not just domestic but international stuff, which I think is going to be big in this next year, especially for season three to be shown through all over the world. But it's always fun. It comes down to funding. You know it's hard, that's it. Does you? You were attracted to duck camp dinners because we filmed it like it was a documentary. Yeah, you know we have multiple cameras. We try, because we know that we're not going to take take twos and take threes. They need to get it or it's not getting. You know so and then we we, we really believe in a quality of filming and getting people that really know their their way around in production and in the post edit about coloring and sound syncing and so on and so forth. So that is very intentional. The reason why you watch that show like oh, wow, it's really well done, is because we put a lot of effort and that means a lot of money, into creating these shows, probably more so than Any other thing on pursuit, channel, outdoor and so on, so forth, like Probably closer to even more than meat eater in a lot of ways. You know the actual show. So those things cost money and I think that's that's the hardest. That's the hardest part is like you know, a lot of the brands that I like to work with and for duck came dinners are small Louisiana based brands, so you can't go to them and ask for 50 grand, 100 grand, yeah, but you also don't want to have 20, 30 product sponsors on a show where it all now it like feels like a commercial changing t-shirts every three minutes?

Speaker 1:

Yes, and so you're just.

Speaker 2:

You know we try. That's been the the biggest challenge. We. We were blessed this season. Tabloids, anna officer tourism come in and say we believe in it. It checks a lot of boxes for us from a tourism side and and we're able to create great assets for them for photo and video. But it's the, it's the funding thing and and that you know like don't anybody watching this like I love the show, I do it because I think it's fun, I Love hunting, I love cooking, I love being with my friends, but it also was a job for me. Yeah, it's a business and so it's got to be a business and or else it doesn't Really make a lot of sense to do it. I mean, I at least have to like not lose money on it, right? So, anyways, funding is a huge part part of it, and partners that believe in the show and that want to grow with the show is Obviously a huge part of it. So, to answer your question, yes, I absolutely believe it. How we make it, that's that's gonna be, that's gonna be a Another, another subject, you know what?

Speaker 1:

now watch, you get like all these calls and you're gonna be like every single state Once. Okay, now you come over here, you I could, I could. But like with that, like having the Louisiana border tourism behind you, like I can't think of a better fit and being in like you're. You know your new distribution network and things like it just sounds like everything is going in such a great way and I can just see this kind of snowballing because it's such a great way to look at a state and Really get a feel for everything, of the people, of the food, of the culture, of the wildlife. And you know, I do want to circle back to one thing. When you were talking about, like the idea of all the different ecological things you have to be aware of, do you feel like, as your kind of you know, the status of you being a representation, a representative of Louisiana? In that sense it feels like you're bringing that, you know, conservational aspect to that approach and that educational bit, and I've seen it in some of the other ones. Do you? Is that something in season 3 that you might be kind of putting a little bit more focus on? Like hey, this area over here, this marshes in danger because of x, y or z like is. Do you feel like there's some responsibility on your shoulders to make sure that you are Equally representing all those things in the perils to and like the attention that like we have to focus on this so that we keep these Resources? Is that something in in your mindset?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, a hundred percent, almost all the time, almost every day, whether I'm filming or not. That's in my mind, especially as it pertains to Louisiana, and I'll give you a perfect example. This is in real time, real time right now. We had to go, so I leave on Sunday to go shoot our first episode of season 3 in West Louisiana on a teal hunting. Basically, teal season right now just open today, and we're gonna go film four days and it's gonna be our first teal episodes outside of big duck season, right, what correlates with teal season is alligator season, the only the only month out of the year that we can hunt them in Louisiana, and so there's gonna be some of that too. There's gonna be camps, but we had to on the fly as of last week, had to switch completely, switch locations, switch people that's gonna be in camp, because they've been unprecedented marsh fires in Louisiana because of this drought, yeah, and it is so dry that a lot of the places to people are teal hunting today and will for the next 14 days or dried up and can't hunt them. You only can hunt the tea, hunt teal, if you have water access or access to pump water into your fields, which are mostly rice, and there was a big marsh fire that happened a mile away from where we were playing, where we had planned for months to hunt. It had destroyed all the electrical infrastructure for that camp, and so it won't have power for a long time. The the owners are it's a it's a can't where these Four best friends kind of went in on this whole property and these two structures that make this camp, and so we were forced to find another location. I'm lucky enough for us we were connected enough, louisiana to kind of put some feelers out and get a new show, put kind of new. You know last minute yeah, last minute kind of thing and it's all gonna work out, it's great. But we'll use that opportunity and actually mention that and actually kind of talk about that on the show that you know Usually the conversation with Louisiana's having too much water right and, and water encroaching on solid land and fresh marsh, which is which is Obviously still an issue, with saltwater intrusion kind of killing freshwater grasses. But now we're talking about marsh fires and whether it's marsh fires in the south or Forest fires in the northwestern part of the state, which they've been like. I was talking to my mom and my dad and some other folks that are, you know, generations ahead of me About this and they say never in their lifetime could they ever recall any type of wildfire happening in Louisiana. And this year we've had Five, six of them throughout the state and one of them affected, you know, these folks's property directly, this production of duck camp, dinner season, three directly, and we were, we had to pivot and it's it's those things that, yes, like in terms of conservation, in terms of habitat loss and so on and so forth. I mean, shoot, we're in Katie, texas right now. Yeah, we can talk about the Katie prairies. Yeah, you know, for a lot too, and that, and in that type of habitat loss in Louisiana it's a little different, because a lot of the habitat loss was Inhabitable anyway by humans but highly habited by wildlife, which is which is now being threatened on all kind of different levels. And now we're seeing people's habitats being threatened by wildfires and I'm not like again, like usually too much water this year, for whatever reason. Droughts everywhere, from Texas, at least from you know, speaking, speaking firsthand from Texas to Louisiana. That's right, man, it's just dry. And so you know, those things are always on my mind. I remember in LA history class when I was eighth grade we went from elementary to my high school, went from eighth to 12th and and eighth grade, la history class, and I remember coach art, coach, art knockin. He would say. He'd say, you know, had this funny accent and so on. I'm not gonna try to repeat it, but he would say you know, louisiana loses 15 every 15 minutes. Louisiana loses 100 yards of land. Now, that is Correct, but also incorrect in the sense that it's actually losing more than that in a lot, in a lot of places. And so it, because of saltwater intrusion, because of you know different things, we've levied off the Mississippi River, which hasn't allowed that to overflow, replenish with silt and, right, get more hard land, and when we did that long time ago, right, but there's all kind of other things associated with that, and so I've been we've been all aware of this for a very long time, is my point, you know, and and it's not gonna get any, it's not gonna like get better anytime soon, it? We're doing things now to make it better. We're making progress in places with Literally pumping sand and silt Through, basically pipelines from one place to another to build it. But, man, that is, that is an extremely costly, costly effort, especially when you're saying you're battling mother nature which has no care about limited ones. Yeah, about your about your, you know it should do what she wants. Yes, you know, and so we can only do so much to battle that. But there's a lot of good people and a lot of smart people that are. My job is just to shine a light on it, you know, and if I can get more, if I can get more people donating five dollars, fifteen dollars, a hundred dollars to those causes, then great, like I want that to happen. But it's a lot of, a lot of really smart. You know Scientists and engineers that are working on behalf of the state's coastal line and deltas and tributaries that are help building that up. You know there's always gonna be a loser, though. You know the oyster farmers. You know they. They're building up all kind of fresh water. Guess what doesn't grow in fresh water like oysters. So they got to move out, and so there's different things. There's always gonna be somebody affected by it, unfortunately.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Hard to make everyone happy, right.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, but it's it. I'm glad that you're you're shining a light on that and because it is something I mean, every area has something. There are species that are going through problems, wherever it may be, and we need to be able to Kind of look at that and what kind of resources that you know we need to to work with and bring people together to have that awareness, because you want to be able to keep those wild places Wild, you want to keep those animals there and you want to be able to keep this lifestyle, because we there's been areas where you know, I mean even in historically, even in Texas, like where I hunt turkeys they were wiped out, they were over hunted and you had to reintroduce them because somebody took the effort to bring back these species to be native. So when you're like, oh, are these native turkeys? Well, kind of they were coming from over here. But but I mean that and that happens a lot of different places, because people want to bring back, you know, the bison and buffalo, right, there was areas that they were completely wiped out. Now they're there in certain spots, but they weren't there for X, many years, hundred years, whatever it was, until someone made the decision I want to bring back the original landscape or whatever. So I think that's very important for us to do in our native species and be aware of, like you know, the invasive ones too and what we can do, because there are some everywhere. We, you know, we talked about feral hogs. Right, it's like everywhere, everywhere, used to be. Like they said, it's not if you know or not, when it's, if it there, whatever, it's the other way around, but it's like they were gonna be everywhere and they are, seems like now it's when yeah, yeah, it's just it's going to hit that next county. I think they finally said it's like every county in Texas, because there was like one holdout. It was like no, I don't know, they build a wall. I don't know what they did, but they dug under, so now they're there I got a guy's ARs at night.

Speaker 2:

We will defend this county. I.

Speaker 1:

Kind of want to go to that camp for a day See what that looks like. I'll be interesting. Some good eating, right, good character. Call up Jesse, hey man. Let's do some stuff. Hey, everyone just wanted to take a minute to tell you about my favorite Cajun seasoning out there. About 15 years ago, I was gifted with some slap your mama seasoning and there has not been a day since then that I have not had it in our kitchen, whether it's at the house or at the ranch. Heck, I've even sent this all around the country as gifts to friends. It is by far my favorite seasoning out there. So let me tell you a little bit about slap your mama. Founded in 2001 by the walkers, slapping mama brings the soul Louisiana cooking to life. It was there, around the Walker family kitchen table deep in the heart of Louisiana, that a family came together to capture the taste that they grew Up lovin, all with the goal to share it with future generations. Now, today, the slap your mama brand has evolved into a masterpiece of flavor, with its new look and expanding line of products, ranging from original spices to fry batter, classic meal mixes and more. And as a leading producer of authentic Cajun seasoning, they knew that they needed a branch out new, exciting avenues into the southern cooking world, and they've done just that. You can check out their seasonings, their sauces and in fact, you can even buy a cookbook that they put out as well, talking about what to do with all their amazing product lines. Guys, choose, slap your mama for your next meal and experience the magic of real home cooking. To learn more, go to slap your mama calm today. You'll be glad you did so. I had a couple other questions, and one is, admittedly, self serving. I'm going on my very first teal hunt next week and I know that I'm going to be able to bring back a lot of meat, and I want to just ask you, because one of the things I do is I interview a lot of different chefs every single while. You know, while game chefs every single fall and give a little bit back to people who want to learn about you know what to do. So if, like let's say, I've I've got a lot of knock down, you know 5d teal and I want to try to, you know, cook this the best way to, where my wife Meg and our daughters will love this. What would you suggest as far as preparation? What do you suggest is like hey, this is the one that I like the best, because I know we can go all over the board and all the different types of different ways we could do this, but let's go ahead and, you know, give the listeners and me some ideas on on what you would do. You got teal in the cooler. What are you doing then? Yeah, so let's just set the table and let's go ahead and get the some ideas on on what you would do. You got teal in the cooler. What are you doing then?

Speaker 2:

yeah, so let's just set the table. It's September here in Texas, it's not cold right, and it may be what 70 degrees maybe if you're lucky in the morning. So the first thing during teal season and you may get like made fun of it, looked at funny, but if you really serious about wanting to make sure that is the best it can possibly be, when it gets your table, especially during teal season, that bird is going to go get retrieved. It's going to come back into the blind and get the teal best it can possibly be. When it gets your table, especially during teal season, that bird is going to go get retrieved. It's going to come back into the blind. The bet the worst thing to do is just pile them up and let them sit in that blind, like they're like going to be there for an hour, two hours. And if you can, if you're, if you're, you know, willing to do this, at the very least open up its chest cavity. It's, it's it's feathers, if you will, like you know, if you were going to breast it up, get your thumbs in there and spread that out so it can start cooling right, and bring a little cooler with like some ice packs in it and just put them in there, even better. If you want to just gut them right out into the field, open up that chest cavity reaching there and pull the guts out, then put them in that cooler, even better, because it's just like even sitting in that hot pile. They won't go bad, but they're certainly not going to be the best they can be. Not going to go better, right, not going to go better. That's a good point, that's a good way to put. They're not going to go better like that. And one of the biggest things about wild game and especially waterfowl, is that people say they taste irony or ducky or like, and they can, and that a lot of the reason is because they're having been treated correctly at the kill point. But especially when you're hunting warm weather environments, early season stuff like teal or early season goose even worse, right, the bigger the cavity the animal the more it's going to retain heat. Teal, a little birds, not, you know, maybe three times the size of a dove, so it'll get cooler faster, but still, when you're hunting 7580 degree weather, like it's only going to get 7580 degrees, you know what I mean. So if you can bring a little soft cooler with some ice packs in it, even if you don't pull the guts out of spread, put them in the, put them on top of the ice, start to get that cool down, that'll, that'll. That's your first step to getting the best posture you can at the table now. Teal or are are are synonymous boost just being great eating birds. They, they're just. They have little. They're not as red, not deep as red like a, like a mallard would be. So they're. They're not as quote unquote ducky as some people like it. And you know, if you do that first part you'll likely succeed in the rest. Because you've treated so well. You can like put them on a short little brine if you if, especially for first time eaters just make a simple little salt water solution, not too salty, let a little bit of that's you know how the most is happened and kind of pull some blood out. If you will again, especially if you just like doing a quick grill for the family, that might be a good way to introduce them slowly to. To that I would say that's more important for bigger ducks or geese or something to do that, but for teal again, not knowing your family's at like feeling towards all that, it could be helpful, man, I do this. So on the second season, the last episode, I make this apples and bacon and bourbon dish with a speckle bellies and I make that a lot of camps now, that duck dish, and people always tell me that's the best duck dish they've ever had. You know, that's something my dad used to make a lot with all the birds that we shot and I've just I've kind of shifted up just enough to like make it my way and it tends to really appeal to a lot of people so I can shoot you over that kind of recipe. Oh yeah, because I don't think we actually documented the word for word recipe on the show, but it's, it's all there kind of in video format on that last episode of season two and it's when I light all that pappy van week on on fire which I do that for the next episode, you know. But that's a good one, especially because it's got like this savory and sweet kind of ding to it. It's great for new. It's great, it's a great dish for new duck eaters because it's just, you know, it appeals to a lot of American palates, if you will. Yeah, a lot of bacon, a lot of onions, some sour apples in there, some good brown sugar and butter and bourbon in there, and it makes a gravy and you can eat that over rice and with some vegetables or just kind of pick at it. Like that, but really like again, like those teal are going to eat great on the smoker or on the grill, especially if you take care of them in the field, and more so than ever during this teal season which will be filming, which I'm going to do myself, like, yeah, which will be, it's even important for you. Like you know, you just want that bird to be the best it can be at the table. Then it, it, it, it matters what you do with it in the field like with any.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, but that's something that a lot of people don't know it's talking to most people. Don't do that yeah talking to Jesse's like okay, here's what you do, keep it dry. I mean, how many times people just throw ice on the meat immediately and it's like, no, you know? It's like, okay, here's what you can do, contractor bags, something like. There's a lot of different things that I've talked to the different chefs about and the preparation in the field, and that's where it starts and a lot of people they haven't maybe realize that it's going to affect it whether you take it to the process or where you do it at home, and it's like there are some one-on-one so you have to do and that's it's very important, so that's.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was planning on grabbing a cooler and doing that exact same thing, so I like I like the frozen packs of ice because they don't you know, you're not carrying sloshy water and they're not getting wet, and I don't like putting things in contractor bags, especially if I got 12 birds in it, because that you know, I ideally I have that, you know, that square, soft yeti cooler. I got four of those ice packs in it and I'm leaving the top even up and just letting it breathe with whatever birds I have in there, and I had, the very least, getting that feather off that breast cavity and opening up that cavity and then throwing it on there, not worrying about, like, what blood gets on, whatever if you're going to pluck them or what, like, it's just cool them down yeah, I guess it depends on how good the hunt is to if, like you, have the time to go ahead and get them on here.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, just next.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah certainly you'll have some walls right, bang out a couple of them. But again, like, just like, having that cooler there with those ice packs, even if you're not going to do anything with the bird to get them in that and not in the pile, yeah, yeah, on the side of the blind, and Jesse talks about dove hunting, how he likes dove toads. For that reason, right legs, hanging them from things that allows air to get through those dove, yeah, and so you can bang out your limit be an hour and still, and but having those toads just allow those birds not being a pile of fire ants and and just steaming on top of each other, all those little things. Which is why, like Dutch duck straps are good, yeah, but duck traps are really useful for that when it's 3040 degrees outside, sure like yeah, I mean right now.

Speaker 1:

You can put them on your hip and they might cook. It's so hot on the field. Yeah, like I said, like you're lucky if you get 70 degrees.

Speaker 2:

Sure that's not last.

Speaker 1:

And long, yeah, you know yeah well, look, I know we're going to wrap it up soon. I had two other questions. You know, I really I've been talking a lot of people about their legacy, right, and I wanted to ask you this and kind of, what is it that you want your legacy to be? You know, professionally, personally, and you know, how do you see that, how do you see that shaping out and what you want to be remembered by? You know, and it's not just like, oh, you know, when you're dead down, like right now, what you're putting down on the ground and what you're doing. What is it that you want to be able to leave behind for, like you said, documenting like your, your, your duck camp dinners and stuff too. It's like if there was a time when you had to stop. What is it that you want to be remembered at?

Speaker 2:

give me your ideas on legacy oh well, I mean, maybe because I'm a new dad, son being 19 months old I want, I want him to be proud of me, I want my family to be proud of me, both professionally and personally, and that's a very like overarching statement. But I feel like me just being myself staying humble, working hard, doing things that I love to do, dumping everything that I have into those things, whether that be him or my family or my work. That's what I want my life to be. I want him to know, and everybody that I that I touch in my life to know, that whatever I did, I did it with a tenacity and I did it with a passion and I did it because I love it, and and that's not and that's not to say that I want them to like be in my eulogy to pat me on the back. It's them, it's me wanting them to have some something like that that they love as well. Yeah, right, like, that's what I want them to know. That doesn't matter If you are classical piano pianist and you in your musician or you want to be the next Steve Rinella or Jim Shockey, right, like, make sure it is something you or you want to change plumbing for your life, or being electric. Make sure it's something that you love to do, and I'm right now in my stage in my life doing something that I Personally, professionally, emotionally, love to do with every fiber in my body. And I hope everybody, not just my son, find something like that. They haven't already, but especially my son yeah just like, whatever you're gonna do, you love it and dump your heart and soul into it.

Speaker 1:

You're the example that he's gonna be seeing and I think you're such a good example for that and you know for for Wild game chef or you know the outdoors conservationist like you're doing so much out there, and I just want to say thank you. Uh, you know so much personally to be able to see the example of someone who's living by you know integrity and by Responsibility and really giving something out, and you are an example that people are looking up to and and you're having fun doing it and it shows and it's uh, it's a proud heart moment, man, to be able to know people like you who are doing that. It inspires me, I know it inspires other people, and just thank you for being that and thanks for sharing who you are Authentically man. Yeah, it's very important to see and I love that.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, well, thanks for having me, man, and, uh, you know what episode will this be?

Speaker 1:

This will be. Let's see.

Speaker 2:

Um, I think we're looking at maybe 35 or 36 right, see, I'm on like that first third of many thousands of episodes down the road for you, I think, and I think you're really you're. I've watched a number of your episodes so far and I'm feel really proud just to be invited on this. So thank you. So thank you for having me and, especially since we're just an hour apart From each other, we should. Yeah, maybe it's not a podcast, but maybe it's a dope line.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, or it's the ranch. Get you a melanistic deer. Yeah, man, the turkeys are great and sent to texas. Man, we'll call up jesse, we'll go and do it up Cool.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, thanks for having me.

Speaker 1:

You're welcome. You're welcome. Hey, and one last thing where can people follow your adventures, your stories? I know you got your instagram channel, uh, your website. Let's just go ahead and throw those out there for anybody who wants to go ahead and follow your journey.

Speaker 2:

So most of my social media is is happening on my instagram, which is chef is genre underscore paul. That's j e a n underscore paul. And uh, like I said, season three actually season one, two and three will all be on waypoint tv. Season one and two come in later this year and season three, coming in roughly july Of um 2024, is what our goal is. The delta waterfowl expo is in late july in baton rouge, louisiana. How great is that? I mean awesome. So our plan is we want to release some episodes before that and some after, have a nice big presence there, be able to shake hands with louisians and people from all over the duck hunting community there. So, uh, if you haven't been to the delta waterfowl expo, I'd say Definitely check it out. It's in baton rouge, louisiana, this year and I just couldn't be more excited to have it in my home state and get to see all the people, uh, that have followed the show and follow my career. So if you're going to follow me on instagram, you might as well follow me in real life and come say hello in july.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, I will be there, and this time I won't just be waving there you go. You need to carve that out for sure and for those who don't know, like, I ended up being in Uh little, was it little little rock there this last year and it just happened to be on our way up with my wife, meg, and I and our youngest, and we just stayed there as like a little halfway point to tennessee, and then I'm looking at all these people walking around. I was like what's happening? Yeah, my people are here. I was like, yeah, it's the delta waterfowl. I was like, oh yeah, brent Reeves is like, are you going? I was like I didn't know, it was even here. And then I'm looking through and I'm like, no way, jump holes there too. And so, but you were busy doing, uh, it's cooking, you're cooking them up. So we got to be in the same room and wave at each other for like 25 yards away. So now we're here full circle and I will be there in baton rouge to support you and to check that out, and a great, great, great group of people with delta waterfowl, sure is. So, hey, man, thanks again, and uh, looking forward to having you on again someday. We'll talk more about the next thing you got going, let's do it, george. Thanks, man, cheers Take care.

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